Dialogues

The purpose of dialogues with other churches is to work towards the unity of the church which is God's gift and will.

The Uniting Church in Australia was formed around this vision of the church. The dialogue groups adopt specific aims within the broader purposes of seeking to promote greater understanding, developing areas of theological agreement, and finding ways of mutual sharing in mission as a way of fulfilling Jesus' prayer, "that they may be one, that the world may believe" (John 17:21).

Documents created by dialogues are offered to both churches for further consideration. They do not have the status of official teaching until they are formally approved by the relevant church authority responsible for Doctrine. There are currently active dialogues between the UCA and four other churches:

  • Anglican Church of Australia (ACA)
  • Roman Catholic Church (RC)
  • Lutheran Church of Australia (LCA)
  • The Salvation Army (TSA)

1. ACA/UCAlogo-ACA-UCA

This document was officially signed by the UCA in February, 2001. It has been received for study by the ACA. See attachments below.

 


 2. RC/UCAlogo-RC-UCA

This document is the report from the Roman Catholic Church/Uniting Church in Australia Dialogue which has met in Brisbane from 2004 – 2008. It was launched in September 2010 and is commended to the churches for study. See attachment below.


3. LCA/UCAlogo-LCA-UCA

The Declaration was accepted by both churches in 2009. For those concerned about the possibilities of practical co-operation between our two churches, the most relevant documents agreed to by both churches are included with the Declaration. See attachment below.

The National Dialogue between the Lutheran Church of Australia and the Uniting Church in Australia has met from 2004-08 in order to produce a report on the topic Summary and Outcome of Discussion on Interpretation of Scripture. This work has now been completed and the document is being considered by both churches. See attachment below.

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4. TSA/UCAlogo-TSA-UCA

A new phase of this dialogue began in 2005 with a focus on questions of Social Justice and Holiness.